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WPA Children’s Day Nursery 1938

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Photo: RTD Staff

This March 1938 image shows children washing up in one of the day nurseries run by the Works Progress Administration in Suffolk. The WPA was a New Deal employment program, and The Times-Dispatch had published an editorial questioning its value. A reporter and photographer were sent to Suffolk to tour various WPA projects, and their conclusions shed a positive light on the effort.Continue Reading [→]

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Forest Hill old Stone House 1942

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Photo: RTD Staff

This September 1942 image shows the Holden Rhodes House, also known as the old Stone House, located at Forest Hill Park in South Richmond. The house, named for the noted lawyer and businessman who built it, dates to around 1840 and was made of granite from the quarries on the original estate. It was remodeled in the 1930s and for a time was home to a library. The house, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, now serves as an event venue.Continue Reading [→]

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Sabot Station 1979

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Photo: David Ryan

In August 1979, the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway was preparing to close the Sabot Depot station in Goochland County. The station hosted its first passenger train in 1881 and its last in 1957; it limped along until 1979 handling odd jobs. CSX dismantled the building in 1993.Continue Reading [→]

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Junior League HQ 1977

This April 1977 image shows the Mayo-Carter house in the 200 block of West Franklin Street in Richmond. It had recently been purchased to serve as the Junior League headquarters, which it still does today. The house was designed by Carrere and Hastings, the same architecture firm that designed the nearby Jefferson Hotel. The home was built in the late 1800s by tobacco tycoon Peter H. Mayo for his daughter, Mrs. Thomas N. Carter.Continue Reading [→]

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Petersburg Commerce St Train Station 1970

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Photo: RTD Staff

In June 1970, this Seaboard Coast Line Railroad station at Commerce Street in Petersburg was closed. Three years earlier, the Seaboard Air Line and Atlantic Coast Line railroads merged, and passenger traffic from the Commerce Street location was being consolidated into what had been Atlantic Coast’s North Petersburg station in Ettrick. A dozen trains served the city daily at the time.Continue Reading [→]