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Barret House – Navy League 1943

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Photo: RTD Staff

In October 1943, Mary Bell Miller (left) and Virginia Weddell hosted a group of bluejackets at the Barret House in downtown Richmond. Miller was a hostess and Weddell was president of the Woman’s Council of the Navy League, which used Barret House as a social club for sailors during World War II. The house at 15 S. Fifth St. dates to the 1840s, when tobacconist William Barret built it as a private residence, and it is now used as offices for asset management firm Thompson Davis & Co.Continue Reading [→]

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Richmond Skyline 1951

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Photo: RTD Staff

This April 1951 image shows the Richmond skyline as seen from the south end of the Lee Bridge. The span in the foreground was a small automobile bridge to Belle Isle, mainly used by employees working on the island. The bridge was largely washed away in rains from the remnants of Hurricane Agnes in 1972, and now only the supports and a small portion on the island remain.Continue Reading [→]

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New Bellevue School Bookmobile Stop 1966

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Photo: Carl Lynn

In September 1966, a new stop was added to the Richmond Bookmobile schedule at the Bellevue School. Here, Principal General Johnson met children at the back door while Frances C. Snead (seated left) and Olive Nelson worked on library cards. To serve the Church Hill community, the bookmobile was put on a year-round schedule, stopping for three hours every Wednesday morning.Continue Reading [→]

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James River Flood 1937

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Photo: RTD Staff

In late April 1937, the James River crested at 27 feet in Richmond as one brave soul crossed the bridge to Belle Isle. Days of drenching rains to the north led to statewide property damage estimated at more than $2 million, with half of that concentrated in Fredericksburg.Continue Reading [→]

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Byrd Park 1936

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Photo: RTD Staff

This January 1936 image shows the Carillon in Byrd Park as seen from across Swan Lake. The design for a memorial to World War I’s dead was debated in the mid-1920s, with Richmond industrialist Granville Valentine leading a campaign for a carillon – despite a war memorial commission favoring an alternative. The state ultimately endorsed a carillon, and the bell tower was dedicated in October 1932.Continue Reading [→]